[KINDLE] ❅ News of the World ❥ Philip Levine – Freeboooks.com

News of the World A Superb New Collection From A Great American Poet Still At Work On His Almost Song Of Himself The New York Times Book ReviewIn Both Lively Prose Poems And Formal Verse, Philip Levine Brings Us News From Everywhere From Detroit, Where Exhausted Workers Try To Find A Decent Breakfast After The Late Shift, And Henry Ford, Supremely Bored In His Mansion, Clocks In At One Of His Plants From Spain, Where A Woman Sings A Song That Rises At Dawn, Like The Dust Of Ages, Through An Open Window From Andorra, Where An Old Communist Can Now Supply You With Anything You Want A French Radio, A Cadillac, Or, If You Have A Week, An American Film StarThe World Of His Poetry Is One Of Questionable Magic A Typist Lives For Her Only Son Who Will Die In A War To Come Three Boys Fish In A River While A Fine Industrial Residue Falls On Their Shoulders This Is A Haunted World In Which Exotic Animals Travel First Class, An Immigrant Worker In Detroit Yearns For The Silence Of His Siberian Exile, And The Western Mountains Maintain That Huge Silence We Think Of As Divine A Rich, Deeply Felt Collection From One Of Our Master Poets


10 thoughts on “News of the World

  1. says:

    A StoryEveryone loves a story Let s begin with a house.We can fill it with careful rooms and fill the roomswith things tables, chairs, cupboards, drawersclosed to hide tiny beds where children once sleptor big drawers that yawn open to revealprecisely folded garments washed half to death,unsoiled, stale, and waiting to be worn out.There must be a kitchen, and the kitchenmust have a stove, perhaps a big iron onewith a fat black pipe that vanishes into the ceilingto reach the sky and exhale its s A StoryEveryone loves a story Let s begin with a house.We can fill it with careful rooms and fill the roomswith things tables, chairs, cupboards, drawersclosed to hide tiny beds where children once sleptor big drawers that yawn open to revealprecisely folded garments washed half to death,unsoiled, stale, and waiting to be worn out.There must be a kitchen, and the kitchenmust have a stove, perhaps a big iron onewith a fat black pipe that vanishes into the ceilingto reach the sky and exhale its smells and collusions.This was the center of whatever family lifewas here, this and the sink gone yellowaround the drain where the water, dirty or pure, ran off with no explanation, somehow like the pointof this, the story we promised and may yet deliver.Make no mistake, a family was here You seethe path worn into the linoleum where the wood,gray and certainly pine, shows through.Father stood there in the middle of his lifeto call to the heavens he imagined above the roofmust surely be listening When no one answeredyou can see where his heel came down againand again, even though he d been taughtnever to demand Not that life was especially cruel they had well water they pumped at first,a stove that gave heat, a mother who stoodat the sink at all hours and gazed longinglyto where the woods once held the voicesof small bears themselves a family and the songsof birds long fled once the deep woods surrenderedone tree at a time after the workmen arrivedwith jugs of hot coffee The worn spot on the sillis where Mother rested her head when no one saw,those two stained ridges were handholdsshe relied on they never let her down.Where is she now You think you have a rightto know everything The children tiny enoughto inhabit cupboards, large enough to have roomsof their own and to abandon them, the fatherwith his right hand raised against the sky If those questions are too personal, then tell us,where are the woods They had to have beenbecause the continent was clothed in trees.We all read that in school and knew it to be true.Yet all we see are houses, rows and rowsof houses as far as sight, and where sight vanishesinto nothing, into the new world no one has seen,there has to bethan dust, wind borne particlesof burning earth, the earth we lost, and nothing else


  2. says:

    THE AGNOSTIC PARABLES OF PHILIP LEVINE News of the Worldby Philip LevineHardcover 80 pagesAlfred A Knopf October, 2009 In Philip Levine s most recent collection, News of the World, the last poem in the book, Magic, begins by describing Detroit s Michigan Central Terminal, now destined to go the way of New York s Pennsylvania Station The poem s speaker recounts the terminal s importance as the scene of his early enlightenment, where he learned about treasures of the world he d never THE AGNOSTIC PARABLES OF PHILIP LEVINE News of the Worldby Philip LevineHardcover 80 pagesAlfred A Knopf October, 2009 In Philip Levine s most recent collection, News of the World, the last poem in the book, Magic, begins by describing Detroit s Michigan Central Terminal, now destined to go the way of New York s Pennsylvania Station The poem s speaker recounts the terminal s importance as the scene of his early enlightenment, where he learned about treasures of the world he d never dreamed of, such as an elixir called Penrod his way of pronouncing the French aperitif, Pernod At first the speaker appears to us as a laughable working stiff whose recollections of the past border on the fantastical And what he recounts to his grandkids are only those magical parts of his past, when cats and dogs traveled first class and elms and maples sprang up full grown overnight between the tracks So when we finally arrive in the poem at what he doesn t tell them the story of Carey, a friend and co worker, the tone begins to change until in the final lines the fancifulness of the speaker falls away like the sense of life s magic which he is trying so hard to keepIt took me years to learna way of walking under an umbrellaof indifferent stars, and to call them heavenlybodies, to regard myself as no partof a great scheme that included everything.I had to put one foot in front of another,hold both arms out for balance, stare ahead,breathe like a beginner, and hope to arrive These lines are spoken in reaction to what has happened to Carey, who after his return from Korea as a young hero, his hair having turned gray, smashes his treasured collection of Lester Young and Billie Holiday 78s, the very music which before the war had transported both the speaker and Carey closer to paradise than they d ever been This is the news of the world Change governs our most immutable expectations of everything and everybody the monumental permanence of the terminal now about to be torn down, the divine silence of the mountains in the very first poem of the book as they dissolve imperceptibly into dust, the communists of Andorra now turned capitalists in the title poem of the book, and even what we had expected of Carey, who before the war had lived for violence, seeking out brawls every Friday night after work Suddenly all of that changes and not necessarily in a pretty way or for the better Through out Levine s seventeen books, his poems often appear to be anecdotes based upon his life Whether what he writes is factually true or a fiction is unimportant, the poems always convey a sincerity and an authenticity which ring true They are never meant to confess, to tell you Levine s story, per se Indeed, the still blond, still Nordic speaker of Magic, who later grows squat and bull necked, is quite obviously not Levine Instead, these poems stand as agnostic parables about the way we live, and their speakers do not regard themselves as part of a great scheme They are only trying make sense of their and, by extension, our own experiences They investigate the values we hold, and what it costs to hold them The language of these poems is always simple, and designed to focus the reader toward the tale at hand, and it is Levine s unerring eye and ear which can always find that poignant detail, that vivid image, that right word which will transport the reader to the heart of the matter The Oxford American Dictionary defines news as noteworthy information, and this is what Levine gives the reader News of the World informs us of values we may be in danger of losing It seems to echo and remind us of what William Carlos Williams once wrote, It is difficult to get the news from poems, yet men die miserably every day for lack of what is found there Or they hold out both arms for balanceand hope to arrive


  3. says:

    News of the World is a volume of poems about work, about disappearing industrial activity, and the flourishing of rust Levine writes about closed factories This is celebration of the past and a world now gone He stands in the junkyards of America s midwest remembering the vanished times of the metal lunchbox and lines of men filing under skies busy with stacks and smoke and through workshops filled with the clamor of industry and purpose Mostly he s remembering a childhood growing up in sett News of the World is a volume of poems about work, about disappearing industrial activity, and the flourishing of rust Levine writes about closed factories This is celebration of the past and a world now gone He stands in the junkyards of America s midwest remembering the vanished times of the metal lunchbox and lines of men filing under skies busy with stacks and smoke and through workshops filled with the clamor of industry and purpose Mostly he s remembering a childhood growing up in settings such as these The poems here are evocative, nostalgic, and sometimes sad One called Library Days is a favorite because it reminded me of myself He describes visiting the library as if entering a house of worship and recalls librarians who cast a suspicious eye on a kid who d read so voraciously Even this poem is about work He considers heavy reading an endeavor, the idea of digging into literature a slow tidal movement toward ambition I also admired a central section of prose poems It s a favorite style of mine when it doesn t fly off into the surreal Levine avoids that and writes with delicacy about Europe, the fifties, the closed diner, the closed factory, the door closed on childhood


  4. says:

    I feel almost obligated to love Levine s work since he is the Poet Laureate, and while I appreciate his narrative style, I also grew a little tired of that singular approach My favorite poems in this collection are Magic and On Me


  5. says:

    Of Philip Levine s book News of the World, what impacted me the most was contained in sections II and III and IIII I appreciated these parts because they hit a nerve with how most Americans probably feel in their day to day working life How Levine can capture this in poetic form is so pure, so beautiful With poems like On Me , Homecoming , and Arrival and Departure , my attention was fixed, and I started to see why Levine should be celebrated Let s look at my personal favorite, Arrival Of Philip Levine s book News of the World, what impacted me the most was contained in sections II and III and IIII I appreciated these parts because they hit a nerve with how most Americans probably feel in their day to day working life How Levine can capture this in poetic form is so pure, so beautiful With poems like On Me , Homecoming , and Arrival and Departure , my attention was fixed, and I started to see why Levine should be celebrated Let s look at my personal favorite, Arrival and Departure for a quick example Levine describes this town and how it changed over the years, and the people he met there The passage of time is absolutely stunning and awful The Plating plant on Trumbull had moved to Mexico or heaven Levine describes a man in this poem, You came north to Detroit in Winter What were you thinking Leaving a poem with a question keeps uncertainty with the reader, but also with the closure you will never get in the poem Closure that this town will never see This poem holds many themes or treasures that I will not go into this review, because I don t want to spoil it But this is a short example on the power of his work What surprised me the most about this book were the prose poems in section III I wasn t expecting Levine to use the ampersand I certainly wasn t expecting them to be as beautiful as the regularly formatted poems This versatility of subject and theme shows the strength of Levine s work and talent My personal favorite poem in this section is Island because he describes New York s islands and his youth spent there In both my examples, Levine shows the way in which he can be intimate with the reader The vulnerability is where the authenticity of his work lies After reading this, I am going to pick uppoetry by Levine after reading this, and I would recommend reading him if you haven t yet Especially in the age of political unrest or discontent, Levine provided me with some comfort that this has happened before, and will continue to cycle He puts a looking glass to the working class, and you will soon see as I saw, that there is rarely an upswing for the working class That even when things are good, they never reach great There is a certain amount of happiness in his work, showing the good along with the bad


  6. says:

    Thank you to my brother Gary for this book.I was expecting the news of its title to be metaphorical and internal, but these poems are informed by history and politics as the author experiences different places and their people News of the world, indeed The lieutenant enjoys this repartee, he s amused by my innocence, he shakes his head, he is discreet patient with this visitor to his ancient city that boasts the first Plaza de Toros in all the world You Americans, he suppresses Thank you to my brother Gary for this book.I was expecting the news of its title to be metaphorical and internal, but these poems are informed by history and politics as the author experiences different places and their people News of the world, indeed The lieutenant enjoys this repartee, he s amused by my innocence, he shakes his head, he is discreet patient with this visitor to his ancient city that boasts the first Plaza de Toros in all the world You Americans, he suppresses his laughter


  7. says:

    News of the world by Philip Levine Alfred A Knopf, a division of Random House Inc., New York N.Y 2009 News of the world by Philip Levine is a collection of prose poetry that brings the happenings of the world to the reader s fingertips News of the world is a snapshot collection of poems that capture the essence of America and the world Philip Levine gives contemporary poetry a fresh perspective by taking readers back into a time of war, a place of solitude, and desperation His poems News of the world by Philip Levine Alfred A Knopf, a division of Random House Inc., New York N.Y 2009 News of the world by Philip Levine is a collection of prose poetry that brings the happenings of the world to the reader s fingertips News of the world is a snapshot collection of poems that capture the essence of America and the world Philip Levine gives contemporary poetry a fresh perspective by taking readers back into a time of war, a place of solitude, and desperation His poems read like prose poetry, by telling the reader stories of events both glorious and traumatic in order to recapture the essence of those moments in time For instance, the poem Not worth the wait , this poem reads like a story with no line breaks and no rhythm that would be found in poetic verse It s fluid, the presentation of the poem is like prose It communicates meaning rather than draw attention to structure and meter Everything in Lisbon is remembered, everything is entered by hand in enormous ledgers that are presented forever My heart sank I imagined myself like some sad aged clerk out of Dickens or Melville spending day after day scanning the pages of funeral books in order to catch a name 39 Here, Philip Levine uses figurative language to describe the city of Lisbon as a data entry database This portrays Lisbon as a historic place that is full of culture and history Lisbon is a place of authenticity, a place that cannot be forgotten This is an example of Philip Levine s method of using prose poetry to transport and recreate a moment trapped in time by the imagination Philip Levine transports the reader to a distant place that they may have never been before by adding sentimental value and a conversational tone Further, Philip Levine also incorporates poetry with line breaks in News of the world For example his poem Burial Rites Philip Levine uses enjambment to create a desired effect The stanza in which he describes his mother s burial incorporates enjambment Six years ago I buried my mother s ashes beside a young lilac that s now taller than I, and stuck the stub of a rosebush into her dirt where, like everything else not human, it thrives The use of enjambment conveys a somber mode The reader is able to feel the immense strain and anguish that one feels when burying a loved one There s no need for a pause, no line breaks are needed The enjambment portrays how one s thoughts continue, and linger though it may be hard to comprehend all of one s feelings at the moment of pain Its opposite is an end stopped line which causes the reader to pause and catch a breath in order to go on to the next stanza End stopped stanzas are fluid, while enjambment is choppy and edgy creating an effect of somberness News of the world summarizes Philip Levine s intentions of illustrating the vast demographics of the world


  8. says:

    Something between a 3 and 4, but fuck it, I love the whole working man s voice thing Levine s got going on and I love him and he got himself named the Poet Laureate, I ll give him the benefit of the doubt There s not much to say This is poetry that someone who got put off poetry from too many high school English classes but what is the poet really saying can get into Clean, natural, emotionally gutting I ll let the poetry speak for itself OF LOVE AND OTHER DISASTERSThe punch press op Something between a 3 and 4, but fuck it, I love the whole working man s voice thing Levine s got going on and I love him and he got himself named the Poet Laureate, I ll give him the benefit of the doubt There s not much to say This is poetry that someone who got put off poetry from too many high school English classes but what is the poet really saying can get into Clean, natural, emotionally gutting I ll let the poetry speak for itself OF LOVE AND OTHER DISASTERSThe punch press operator from up northmet the assembler from West Virginiain a bar near the stadium Friday, late,but too early to go home alone Neitherhad anything in mind, so they conversedabout the upcoming baseball seasonabout which neither cared We couldbe a couple, he thought, but she wasall wrong, way too skinny For yearshe d had an image of the way a womanshould look, and it wasn t her, it wasn tanyone he d ever known, certainly nothis ex wife, who d moved back southto live with her high school sweetheart.About killed him I don t need that shit,he almost said aloud, and then realizedshe d been talking to someone, maybeto him, about how she couldn t gether hands right, how the grease ateso deeply into her skin it becamea part of her, and she put her hand,palm up, on the bar and pointedwith her cigarette at the deep linesthe work had carved The life line, he said, which one is that None, she said, and he noticed that her eyeswere hazel flecked with tiny spotsof gold, and then embarrassed lookedback at her hand, which seemed tinyand delicate, the fingers yellowedwith calluses but slender and fine.She took a paper napkin off the bar,spit on it and told him to hold stillwhile she carefully lifted his glasses, leaving him half blind, and wiped something off just above his left cheekbone There, she said, handing him back his glasses, I got it, and even with his glasses on, what she showed him was nothing he could see, maybeonly make believe He thought, Betterget out of here before it s too late, butsuspected too late was what he wanted


  9. says:

    I came into this book with a pretty heavy bias I burned through my first two of his books They Feed They Lion and What Work Is I find the voice of his poetry enchanting This collection begins in the aftermath of violence The first half of the book seems to frequently return to a world just after war from the perspective of a person who was never there Everything is second hand We only touch the violence through relationships with family or watch it shape the world beyond us from a librar I came into this book with a pretty heavy bias I burned through my first two of his books They Feed They Lion and What Work Is I find the voice of his poetry enchanting This collection begins in the aftermath of violence The first half of the book seems to frequently return to a world just after war from the perspective of a person who was never there Everything is second hand We only touch the violence through relationships with family or watch it shape the world beyond us from a library window, but by the third section, there is a terrible shift Section III is written entirely in prose poems, most dealing with a new geography The imagery iscolored in, too colored in, so vivid that I suppose it broke free of the traditional lines of the poems before And when we emerge in the final section of the book, Levine does not leave us on the periphery These new poems are about a childhood lived in the violence of these places We can feel it now The poems forge ahead to their inevitable conclusion in a penultimate poem that allows us to finally be washed clean of it all in a rainstorm and a final poem that seemsa reflection on the collection than an independent poem I m kind of rambling, and I think it s because this collection had a strange personal appeal Throughout my reading, I felt myself thinking a lot about the first time I heard the Miles Davis album Sketches of Spain These poems were musical, and they told a story just beneath the surface that you really have to listen close to hear


  10. says:

    I don t know how the Library of Congress picks the Poet Laureate of the United States I am fairly sure it involves secret meetings and long conversations However, they do it, I am grateful that they just picked Philip Levine I might not have read any poetry by him without having heard the announcement about his appointment.This book is amazing I just don t have the words to do Levine justice His words are all you need Go to the library, check out this book and read Don t speed through it I don t know how the Library of Congress picks the Poet Laureate of the United States I am fairly sure it involves secret meetings and long conversations However, they do it, I am grateful that they just picked Philip Levine I might not have read any poetry by him without having heard the announcement about his appointment.This book is amazing I just don t have the words to do Levine justice His words are all you need Go to the library, check out this book and read Don t speed through it there are less than 90 pages Read each poem Think about it, maybe read it out loud Then go away and come back for another Levine writes stories in his poetry and like all good stories they need to be chewed and digested This poetry requires thought.If you know me, you can pick out a couple of poems that I might love Yes, I did like Library Days and the poems set in Spain But others, ones that I had to warm up to, still stick in my brain Closed , Homecoming and Magic are also wonderful.You could sit down and read this book in an afternoon Or you could say I don t read poetry and never even pick it up Do yourself a favor Take the time to savor this book You won t be sorry


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